Tweet WinterIsComing.net

Series author George R. R. Martin gives a commentary for episode 9, “Blackwater,” the episode he wrote, and while the commentary begins with Martin connecting events in the show with how they originated in the book, once the battle begins he goes off on a lonnnng tangent about… helmets.

Specifically, Martin wanted the main characters to be wearing helmets during the battle scenes. (Sandor Clegane, Tyrion, Stannis, and Lancel Lannister all go without helmets during the battle scene.) The author explains his reasons why (it’s far more realistic, and Clegane’s helmet is really cool) but also acknowledges that he knows why they aren’t wearing helmets (it’s a visual medium and you need to be able to see the main character’s faces).

And yet…! Any time the battle scenes reappear, Martin brings up the helmet issue again. At one point he’s simply repeating “no helmet, helmet, no helmet…” as the camera pans across a bunch of soldiers fighting.

The Best Stuff Revealed in the Game of Thrones Season 2 Blu-ray Set (via lyrabelacqua)
  • me: this book brutally ripped out my heart and tore it to shreds then stomped it into the ground as i drowned in a sea of my tears and basked in eternal sorrow
  • me: here read it

lyndztanica:

Not every library is filled with just books.  >:3  Since my dayjob is an archival library… I guess now is a good time to say we have one of the largest science fiction collections in the country.  And George R.R. Martin’s personal papers.  

Which means sometimes we get warhammers, longswords, obsidian knives, etc.

bowtiesandbaskerville:

“Raise your hand if you’ve ever felt personally victimized by George R. R. Martin…”

A fun George R.R. Martin interview

(beginning around 6:15 and ending 20 minutes into the video)

forfunandstuff:

Write Like the Wind

undesk:

Martin will kill them all

undesk:

Martin will kill them all

(via alexreturn)

Fantasy is silver and scarlet, indigo and azure, obsidian veined with gold and lapis lazuli. Reality is plywood and plastic, done up in mud brown and olive drab. Fantasy tastes of habaneros and honey, cinnamon and cloves, rare red meat and wines as sweet as summer. Reality is beans and tofu, and ashes at the end. Reality is the strip malls of Burbank, the smokestacks of Cleveland, a parking garage in Newark. Fantasy is the towers of Minas Tirith, the ancient stones of Gormenghast, the halls of Camelot. Fantasy flies on the wings of Icarus, reality on Southwest Airlines. Why do our dreams become so much smaller when they finally come true?

We read fantasy to find the colors again, I think. To taste strong spices and hear the songs the sirens sang. There is something old and true in fantasy that speaks to something deep within us, to the child who dreamt that one day he would hunt the forests of the night, and feast beneath the hollow hills, and find a love to last forever somewhere south of Oz and north of Shangri-La.

They can keep their heaven. When I die, I’d sooner go to Middle-Earth.
George R.R. Martin. (via kayleyhyde)

(via iowntheplace)

funnygeekmetalthings:

Valar Morghulis

funnygeekmetalthings:

Valar Morghulis

bookbabble:

How the editing process must have gone for the Song of Ice and Fire

bookbabble:

How the editing process must have gone for the Song of Ice and Fire

Tweet